D-Day Invasion of Europe

June 6, 1944

D-Day is a term used to designate the planned launch of a military operation. In modern history, it is often used to mark the start of the Allied invasion of Europe near the end of World War II.

D-Day is a term used to designate the planned launch of a military operation. In modern history, it is often used to mark the start of the Allied invasion of Europe near the end of World War II.

In early 1943 the Allied forces established of staff to plan the invasion, code named Operation Overlord. Lt. Gen. Frederick Morgan of Great Britain oversaw the planning staff, but the supreme commander of Allied Expeditionary Force, which would carry out the plan, was American Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

The invasion involved transporting allied forces – men, artillery, jeeps, tanks, and supplies – from Great Britain to the main continent of Europe across the English Channel. It would begin with the landing of forces on the beaches of Normandy, France. Originally set for June 5, bad weather postponed the invasion for one day.


On 6:30am, the first of more than 150,000 Allied troops waded ashore. There was fierce fighting on the beaches and more than 9,000 men were killed or wounded.  It was the largest amphibean assault in history.